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New Manager?

USspur

USspur

Player in Training.

Tottenham are in advanced talks with Paulo Fonseca to become the club's next head coach.

The Athletic understands the former Roma manager is the preferred choice of incoming general manager Fabio Paratici. It is understood the former Juventus sporting director is in talks with Fonseca in Italy before flying to London, where Paratici is due to be formally announced.

Fonseca left Roma in seventh place in Serie A at the end of the 2020-21 season.

How did Fonseca perform at Roma?​

Fonseca walked into a tough situation at Roma. The club had just missed out on the Champions League and faced a difficult restructure in light of some expensive mistakes in the transfer market under Monchi.

Owner Jim Pallotta then began takeover talks with the Friedkin Group which stalled when the pandemic hit and re-started over the summer.

A vacuum also opened up at the club when Monchi's successor Gianluca Petrachi was dismissed from his post which left Fonseca vulnerable. All the uncertainty did not make for an easy job.

Roma played some slick football and reached a European semi-final under the Portuguese but his record in big Serie A games and missing out on the top four again persuaded Roma's new owners to break with what they inherited.

Who is Paratici?​

Paratici is an Italian former football player who spent eleven years in a series of executive roles for Juventus, including chief football officer.

Juventus announced last week that his contract would not be renewed with a farewell press conference held on Friday, June 4.

Paratici previously worked with Conte at Juventus between 2011 and 2014, when the club won three consecutive Serie A titles.

The appointment of Paratici means Levy is preparing to delegate oversight of football matters to an influential new figure. Levy has previously employed Comolli, Frank Arnesen and David Pleat in the role of sporting director but abandoned such a strategy in recent years, with Steve Hitchen serving as the club’s effective head of recruitment.

Who else has been under consideration at Tottenham?​

As The Athletic previously reported, former Inter Milan and Chelsea manager Antonio Conte was in talks with Spurs to become their next manager.

Tottenham also made contact with former manager Mauricio Pochettino about a return to the club last month.

The club also spoke to Fonseca at the start of their process but he has moved up the list with the imminent arrival of Paratici.

How did Spurs perform last season?​

Tottenham had a disappointing season, finishing seventh in the Premier League, one place above their position in the 2019-20 campaign.

The north London side were sitting at the top for four weeks in December but a poor run of results saw them drop down the table.

Jose Mourinho was sacked on April 19, 2021, six days before the League Cup final against Manchester City which they lost 1-0.

Ryan Mason stepped in as interim head coach until the end of the season. He did ensure Tottenham finished above Arsenal and sealed a spot in the Europa League Conference after beating Leicester 4-2 on the final day of the season.
 
USspur

USspur

Player in Training.

Paulo Fonseca recommends the risotto. “The way they make it here is amazing,” he says, paying his compliments to Luka Jurowich, the chef at Roma’s training ground. By the sounds of it, Trigoria would merit three Michelin stars were the facility open to the public. “It’s a problem,” Fonseca jokes. “He cooks so well.”

Food isn’t the only reason the svelte and rather charming 47-year-old likes it here. When Fonseca left Shakhtar to replace Claudio Ranieri at Roma he rented a place in the heart of the Eternal City rather than out by the seaside in Ostia where Daniele De Rossi grew up. “I’m not just saying it because we’re doing an interview or because I coach Roma. I’d been to Rome before and I always loved it,” he smiles.

Before lockdown and the latest restrictions came in Fonseca would walk the San Pietrini, the cobbles named after the rocks on which Saint Peter’s basilica was built, the majesty of a city resembling an open-air museum a constant source of wonder and amazement.

Fonseca was born in Mozambique and arrived from Ukraine. As you can imagine, settling in Italy wasn’t difficult. Portugal is, after all, a land of intrepid explorers like Vasco da Gama and Ferdinand Magellan. “History tells us the Portuguese are all over the world,” Fonseca observes, particularly in football management.

He ascribes that to a couple of his compatriots. One is Vitor Frade, the retired university professor, whose pioneering ideas known as tactical periodisation are the Rosetta Stone of Portuguese coaching. “In the past we were very traditional,” Fonseca says. Looking back on his own playing career — Fonseca was a tall centre-back who oscillated between the first and second division — for a long time he thought football was about one thing and one thing only. “All I knew is we should run,” he laughs in recollection. Then Frade came along and his teachings were a revelation.

“Vitor changed a lot,” Fonseca acknowledges. “He changed our mentality.” The other trailblazer is so closely associated with Frade’s methodology that he is mentioned in almost the same breath. His name, however, is much more famous. “When Jose Mourinho appeared, this new mentality appeared,” Fonseca explains. “Jose was so important because he left the country (after upsetting the odds and winning the Champions League with Porto in 2004) and had so much success. This changed the way people look at our coaches.”

Doors that were previously closed suddenly opened. The self-proclaimed Special One bestowed credibility on Portugal as a producer of smart and versatile coaches. Hiring them became in vogue. Andre Villas-Boas got the Chelsea job. Others made names for themselves elsewhere like Marco Silva and Pedro Martins who delivered success in Greece with Olympiakos. Leonardo Jardim won Ligue 1 and reached a Champions League semi-final at Monaco. Fonseca swept all before him with Shakhtar and more recently Jorge Jesus lifted the Copa Libertadores at Flamengo, an achievement that deserves a mention on the shortlist for FIFA’s coach of the year award where he was overlooked.

Fonseca played under Jesus at Estrella Amadora. It turned out to be a transformational experience. Fonseca was nearing his thirties and before then had never shown any inclination to try his hand at coaching once his playing days were over. “Why?” Fonseca asks. “Because we didn’t learn too much as players. The game back then was very traditional, very physical. We used a lot of man-to-man marking. Jorge was the first tactical coach I had. He made us see things differently and I started to think about the game during the game very tactically. It became about three reference points: the space, the ball and our opponent. I learned a lot about defensive organisation from him. All the details of that phase of play. I started to understand many things.”

fonseca-roma


Paulo Fonseca, manager of AS Roma, gives instructions to Pedro (Photo: Giuseppe Maffia/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Fonseca bonded with his assistant Nuno Campos over a mutual appreciation of Jesus’ style. But his vision for how he wants his teams to play was not limited to what he absorbed all those years ago in Amadora. “The team I liked watching most was Pep’s Barcelona,” Fonseca reveals, not that the memories of that particular Blaugrana vintage were the only reason behind Roma signing Pedro this autumn.

In his spare time when he isn’t watching Netflix — “I just finished Making A Murderer,” Fonseca says, “And another documentary I love is the one about Bobby Robson” — he still tries to catch Manchester City games. It’s a bonus that past encounters with them hold fond memories for him. In 2017, Fonseca famously kept his promise to dress up as Zorro after Shakhtar advanced to the Round of 16 of the Champions League. They did it by ending City’s 29-game unbeaten run in all competitions. Roma, as fate would have it, then eliminated his team in the knock-out stages. Guardiola still captures Fonseca’s imagination. “I like the changes he makes.” The evolution from one league to another, Spain then Germany and England. Specifically how the Catalan tweaks things here and there while staying true to his principles. Fonseca has had to do the same in Italy.

“Every game is a different story,” he says. “From a technical-tactical perspective, there isn’t a league like Serie A. Here you have teams that start in one system and finish in another. They change multiple times in the same game and change during the season too so when you play them again it’s different. You have teams that play one opponent this way and another opponent that way. The system isn’t the only thing that changes either, it’s the strategies within them too. They change from game to game as well.”

Fonseca believes this explains the success of Italian coaches abroad. They have triumphed in all five of Europe’s top divisions. More Italians (four) have won Premier League titles than Scots (two),the Portuguese, French, Spaniards or Germans (one each) and a major element to that is there’s little they haven’t seen before. Few problems they haven’t already solved. “Tactically they’re so strong, so well-prepared,” Fonseca argues. “That’s why football is tough here. It’s really tactical. When Italians go to work in another country it isn’t difficult for them.”

Fonseca is widely considered the only foreign coach working in Serie A. Sinisa Mihajlovic and Ivan Juric have been around the league so long first as players and now as managers that the pair feel as local and homegrown as Gian Piero Gasperini and Roberto De Zerbi. The exposure to this unique and still quite insular football culture has sharpened Fonseca’s own instincts and brought a new side out of him. “I’ve had to adapt my ideas. In the past I was obsessive about possession,” he holds his hands up. Put that down to the influence of Guardiola. The prevailing idea went like this: If we have the ball, we can dominate, we are in control.

“I love teams that are courageous on the ball,” Fonseca elaborates. But Serie A made him recalibrate. “I’ve changed now. Keeping the ball as I love to do is not possible in Italy,” he observes and you can see that in the numbers. Roma currently rank midtable in possession (11th). “I’ve come to understand the importance of transitions. I realise how important it is to win the ball and attack fast because all the teams here are defensively well prepared. Finding space is difficult here. If you don’t attack fast they organise very quickly and you don’t have a transition.”

Roma have, for the most part, done that to very good effect this season. StatsBomb ranks them third in high press and counter-attacking shots per 90 minutes and Inter are the only team producing more in terms of expected goals (xG). The switch to a back three in July, Pedro’s arrival in the last transfer window and Henrikh Mkhitaryan’s ability to stay healthy and play at a level comparable to his last season at Dortmund when he was named Bundesliga Player of the Year has given the team a pleasing balance.

After the retirement of Francesco Totti and the departures of Daniele De Rossi, Kevin Strootman, Alessandro Florenzi and Radja Nainggolan, Roma have new leaders around Edin Dzeko and Lorenzo Pellegrini, with Pedro, Mkhitaryan and Chris Smalling lending their experience to an otherwise young team full of talent.

“The character of the players is really important to me,” Fonseca says. “Pedro didn’t play every game at Chelsea but when he did he worked so hard defensively. He is backing up everything I thought I knew about him. As for Mkhi he is very similar to Pedro. They’re very intelligent guys with a strong tactical capacity. But what I like seeing from them is the motivation. Mkhi works like he is 18 every day. It’s not easy to find characters like that. They’re a reference for the team just like Dzeko is.”

A semblance of continuity has helped Roma improve even amid the disruption caused by the pandemic. Fonseca is used to making adjustments in extreme circumstances. “I was coach of Shakhtar for three years and I’ve never been to Donetsk,” he says of his former club who were displaced by the conflict in the Donbass in 2014. “I lived in Kiev. We played in Kharkiv then Lviv. In one year we made 125 flights. It was an amazing experience. It’s like you said the Portuguese adapt easily to different situations.”

fonseca-roma


Fonseca was appointed Roma manager in June 2019 (Photo by Paolo Bruno/Getty Images)
Even prior to COVID-19 making its impact felt across the world, Fonseca faced a number of challenges at Roma. He inherited a team that missed out on the Champions League barely a year after reaching the semi-finals. The wage bill needed shaving. An injury crisis of epic proportions last autumn was difficult to handle even though it didn’t stop an equally epic 4-0 win in Udine where Roma were down to 10 men, playing centre-back Gianluca Mancini in midfield and still returned to the capital with all three points.

Nicolo Zaniolo, the future of this team, was magnificent that night but blew out his knee against Juventus in January. A takeover of the club was on then off then back on again. Gianluca Petrachi, the sporting director, got sacked and will only be replaced next month when Tiago Pinto joins from Benfica after a thorough hiring process conducted by Roma’s reserved but present new owners, The Friedkin Group.

As with almost every transfer window the fear of Dzeko going to Chelsea, Inter or Juventus was real. Fonseca kept things together. Remarkably for someone shouldering the unique pressures of coaching this club in one of the most demanding markets in football, his hair remains jet black. No strands of grey are creeping through.

Which isn’t to say the job is without its stresses. The Sunday-Thursday night routine of a Europa League team was already a grind pre-COVID. Now the calendar is more condensed and congested. Within it, the consistency Roma have found of late — winning five of their last six games in all competitions — is fairly impressive. “No one thinks about this but the players have no time off,” Fonseca says. “In the summer if they play for their national teams they have 10 days holiday. It’s not enough. The other day I saw Kevin De Bruyne voicing his frustration and it’s true. You cannot keep the players in the same shape and at the same level all season when they don’t have a break. It’s physically impossible.”

The quick turnaround between one season and another with no pre-season in between has compounded the issue in Fonseca’s opinion. He thinks it’s one of the reasons why we’re seeing big scorelines all over Europe with Serie A (3.24) almost matching the Bundesliga (3.28) for the highest goals-per-game average this season. The players, particularly at clubs engaged on three fronts, are physically and mentally fatigued. Tactical sessions are at a premium because coaches have to respect their need to recover. Time to go into the finer details is of the essence. Fonseca arrives at our interview after a video analysis presentation cut by his assistant Tiago Leal. “Film is more and more important (since the pandemic hit). If you can’t work on the pitch you work with video,” he says. “But it’s not the same as practice. That’s why we see so many goals.”

Apart from last weekend’s 4-0 defeat to Napoli at the San Paolo — which came after a trip to Romania in the Europa League and was played in the emotive context of Diego Maradona’s death — Roma’s defensive phase has kept things fairly tight, conceding the fewest shots per game this season.

Fonseca enjoys it when I refer to Chris Smalling as Smaldini. “You know I made a big effort to keep him,” he says. “Chris has the ideal characteristics for Italian football. It’s not easy to find centre-backs who are as fast and aggressive as he is.” Roma have built their defence around these attributes. Fonseca highlights Mancini’s leadership skills for his age, Marash Kumbulla’s speed in adapting from Juric’s man-to-man schemes at Verona to playing zone in Rome and Roger Ibanez’s courage on the ball. “He’s a talent,” Fonseca underscores. Different in their own way, each of them share the pace and combativeness to play Fonseca’s style.

Roma have enough about them to regain a place in the top four this year. Of course doing so will be far from easy in a deeply competitive race, especially with a resurgent AC Milan currently leading Serie A and this weekend’s opponents Sassuolo attempting to gatecrash the elite in the style of Atalanta.

But this season could be one to savour under Fonseca and the success of Champions League qualification would no doubt taste even better than the risotto served at Trigoria.
 
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ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
So maybe after appointing Paratici as DoF, Levy has basically said to him "Ok, who, in your opinion, is the best (and cheapest) person we can get who won't want to spend any money ?".

But then I look at it this way, does Paratici really want to shit the bed with his first major appointment ?

He's supposedly being brought in as more of a "General Manager" than a DoF, and he's responsible for "all on-field matters". He's got a pretty solid reputation after his work at Juventus so is he really going to risk that for Levy ?

I don't know. All I know is that I just want this endless manager whack-a-mole to stop.
 
ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
It's worth reading most of that timeline on o'Keefe's twitter because it sums up some elements of our fanbase pretty well.

Nobody had heard of Paratici probably a week to ten days ago, but he's now a "Levy Puppet" and everybody suddenly knows better than him before he's even gotten his feet under the table.

And they're all convinced that he wanted Conte and that Fonseca is a "Levy Choice" despite the fact he agreed to join the club knowing Conte wasn't coming and knowing the situation the club was in.
 
Dorset

Dorset

The Voice Of Reason
Founding Member
Fonseca would walk the San Pietrini, the cobbles named after the rocks on which Saint Peter’s basilica was built, the majesty of a city resembling an open-air museum a constant source of wonder and amazement

....fast forward

Fonseca took one look at the High Road and thought fuck that, I'm not walking round that shithole, oh well, it will only be for a year then that funny little bald chap will send me off with a nice pocketful of money.
 
Yid

Yid

Well-Known Member
Founding Member
Santini...
Jol...
Ramos...
Villas-Boas...
Pochetinhio...
Mourinhio...
And now...
Fonseca...
 
ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
I do wonder how much autonomy Paratici has had in this situation. I'd assume Levy still has a degree of control over the proverbial purse strings but I wonder if the message was "Find me the best manager you can think of who we can get for 'X' amount per year".

But then I still say that Paratici has spent over a decade building a successful reputation for Juventus so I can't see him downgrading to come and join us just to shit the bed the first time of asking. Maybe he knows something about Fonseca that nobody else does ?
 
USspur

USspur

Player in Training.

Irony is splashed across Tottenham Hotspur's search for their next head coach right now as their two month process nears its end with Paulo Fonseca now the leading contender for the role.

On one side you have the Spurs supporters who have expressed their frustration at the length of time it has taken to replace Jose Mourinho, who was relieved of his duties on April 19, and also called for someone to take more of the decision-making power off chairman Daniel Levy.

Both of their demands are set to be met with incoming general manager Fabio Paratici wanting Fonseca, but judging by the outrage on social media the end result is not what the fans wanted.

There is of course also irony on the club side, with Spurs now looking to appoint the man who was pushed aside by Roma so they could appoint.....yes, Jose Mourinho, the man pushed aside by Tottenham.

History will decide which of the two teams got the better end of one of the strangest managerial swaps in recent years.

The deal for Fonseca is close, although not yet done, and this month has already shown that what looks likely to happen at the north London does not necessarily materialise. The reaction of the fans to the news may well also have caused alarm among the already under-fire Spurs hierarchy.

One person inside Tottenham told football.london this week that the club had "chased dreams" in their managerial search since Mourinho left.

Spurs' top choice and their biggest dream was the return of Mauricio Pochettino. The Argentine was the reference point for their brief to find their next manager - favouring attack-minded, possession-based football, developing young players into stars and using the cutting edge sports science techniques introduced by Pochettino.

However, after positive talks with their former boss the attempts to prise him away from PSG proved futile. Real Madrid's approach also washed up on similar rocks as the French giants flexed their muscles and stood firm.

With the Pochettino door closed, so Levy turned towards an old structure he has experimented with many times in the past two decades - the director of football role.

Pochettino is not believed to have been keen on working within such a structure at Spurs this time around, wanting more of a say in key decisions.

With the Argentine out of the picture, Tottenham turned to Paratici, the Juventus transfer guru they had eyed up in the past.

His impending appointment has certainly caused waves within the club. Spurs' current technical performance director Steve Hitchen - who has director of football duties - is believed to have been unaware of the moves to bring in Paratici until late in the process.

Tottenham's new manager search is not the longest Spurs fans have had to wait under Daniel Levyfootballlondon
The treatment of Hitchen, who is popular within Tottenham, has left a number of staff and players unhappy but the club are understood to want him to remain within their new structure.

All eyes will be on Paratici now though and what power he will be able to wield.

His role at Juventus after Beppe Marotta's departure in 2018 had been a bigger, wider ranging role than simply a director of football, more a CEO of sporting matters and it is a similar position that he is expected to take up at Tottenham.

That should in theory give him more power than those directors of football - with various titles - who have come before him in David Pleat, Frank Arnesen, Damien Comolli, Franco Baldini, Paul Mitchell and Hitchen, and struggled within the parameters set by the club.

However, many within Spurs doubt that Levy will ever relinquish too much power at the club. This is a man who by his own admission was constantly on site during the construction of the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, micro-managing to such a degree that he was choosing what type of finish surfaces had in certain rooms and deciding upon the most minute of details.

One sign that points in Paratici's favour is that the club dispensed with Hitchen's shortlist of candidates who met the chairman's desire for a manager who fitted the club's "DNA" and the new man was given the power to decide who he should work with. The strength of a director of football structure does rely on the man at the top choosing the right fit for him as well as the club.

Antonio Conte, suddenly a free agent and someone who had worked closely with Paratici at Juventus, became the next dream but again it did not prove to be a reality.

The former Chelsea and Inter Milan boss did not fit the original profile Levy was looking for, but when one of the world's most successful managers shows interest in your club, it would be folly to not at least talk.

After initial promising discussions, it became clear that Conte and Tottenham were not on the same page in their expectations for the club's financial might this summer and talks soon fell apart. Conte had departed Inter in a similar situation and it is difficult to see how Spurs thought they could present a different project.

Paratici, who has already begun planning the summer transfer activity as well as becoming the key driver in the new head coach search, turned his attentions to Fonseca.

The Portuguese was not on Tottenham's top candidate list in its original form although he was identified as a talented coach, but Paratici has seen enough of him in Serie A in the past two years to push him to the top of his own wishlist after the Conte talks failed.

Those inside Tottenham and within Fonseca's camp believe a deal is close but is not yet finalised.

For the Spurs fans, following the failure to land Pochettino or Conte, the Portuguese has been labelled as an uninspiring choice, coming without the Premier League experience or sustained trophy success outside of his time in the Ukraine at Shakhtar Donetsk.

The 48-year-old, born in Mozambique, did impress at Roma during points in both his two seasons with the club.

In his first campaign he improved on their sixth-placed finish before his arrival to take them up to fifth in the table.

This season, at one point Roma were third during this campaign and seen as one of Serie A's most entertaining sides but injuries hit them hard from March onwards as they competed in Europe as well as domestically and their season fell apart.

Roma ended up, like Spurs, finishing seventh in their final table. It had already been announced that Fonseca would be leaving at the end of season, communicated just days ahead of their Europa League semi-final second leg against Manchester United, with Mourinho to replace him.

On paper, Fonseca does fit that brief Tottenham originally drew up and he is different in style to his Portuguese predecessors in N17 in Mourinho and Andre Villas-Boas.

He likes his teams to play aggressively high up the pitch but with selective pressing in the right moments as they take the game to the opposition and he is believed to be a strong motivator who connects with his players.

Fabio Paratici is expected to join Tottenham Hotspur in the coming days
The 11 best signings Fabio Paratici has made to get Tottenham fans excited about his arrivalfootballlondon
Former Juventus transfer guru Fabio Paratici is set to join Tottenham Hotspur this week
The five biggest transfer mistakes Tottenham's new man Fabio Paratici has madefootballlondon
This season, in describing the way his teams play, Fonseca told ESPN: "No, I don't like playing deep and waiting for the counter-attack. Sometimes it can happen in moments with my team, like against Ajax in the second leg of the quarterfinal, but it is not my style of play."

Critics of Fonseca have said that his team can be vulnerable defensively - something that will concern Tottenham fans after their own defensive concerns season - and the Portuguese said that can be a by-product of his style of play.

"I think [when we've had problems] many times, it hasn't been because other teams created situations against us. It's because we made mistakes, losing balls in the first phase of play," he said.

"I think we paid more dearly for those mistakes than is normal, and that has been our biggest problem, because yes, this type of game that we play can be risky, but in the long run I believe it is successful."


His players do appear to forge a strong connection with him. Henrikh Mkhitaryan, who played for Fonseca at Roma and also under a certain current Chelsea boss at Borussia Dortmund, believes there is a comparison to be made there.

""He is similar to [Thomas] Tuchel, he is trying to put the players in the right position, giving them the freedom to enjoy their style of play," said the midfielder.

"I've had the best coaches in my career and I've learned a lot not only about the game of football, but also about life. Even now that I am 32 years old I want to learn, because I want to know a lot about football and about life."

On Fonseca's style of play, he added: "We play differently depending on who we face, especially when we have the ball. Sometimes we have to stay tight, other times we have to stay wide. It depends on the game and the situation.

"It's not about the position you start the game in, it's about the space. We try to use the space to create opportunities for ourselves and for our teammates. The most important thing is the chemistry between the players, because if you have chemistry you can do different things."

Even long-serving Roma full-back Alessandro Florenzi, who found game time hard to come by under Fonseca, said: "That's something that's fundamental for me, respect for people and their work. The coach was very clear about this.

"Fonseca is one of the greatest coaches I've had in football. The problem is that he might not like me in that particular role and that he expects something else from me. I have a great relationship with him and he clearly told me that he didn't know how much space he could give me."

Fonseca, who speaks good English, has previously admitted he dreams of working in the Premier League.

One key point for Tottenham and Levy will be that praise for the Portuguese from outside of his clubs often centres on him making the best he can from what he's got.

Former Milan midfielder Massimo Ambrosini said this season of Fonseca's Roma: "I like the calmness, the balance, the desire to always try to lead the games. Last year he had the ability to compact the environment with the many injuries. He didn't manage to put his work into practice in full, but he deserved to be reappointed.

"He's a modern coach, he doesn't focus on a single idea, he tries to make the most of what he has available. I still think Roma are very strong. They're well built."

Fonseca also enjoys developing younger players, having given Diogo Jota his debut as a teenager at Portuguese side Pacos de Ferreira, and he has never been afraid of using younger talents at any of his sides, which could bode well for the likes of Oliver Skipp and Ryan Sessegnon next season.

With Tottenham's finances hit hard by the pandemic, the Portuguese's ability to make the most of what he has will appeal to Levy.

Is Paulo Fonseca the right man for the job? Tell us what you think in the comments below.
That Fonseca comes without the need to pay any club compensation for his services will also catch the eye in a week when the Premier League announced that Spurs and the other five English clubs involved in the Super League will collectively pay £22 million, which will go towards "the good of the game", on top of their financial commitments to UEFA after a similar decision.

The fans are underwhelmed by the potential appointment, with many struggling to see how this potential new arrival will convince Harry Kane that his future is best served at Tottenham.

If Fonseca is appointed, it will certainly be a huge test for not only him to adapt quickly to a very different league than he has been used to, but also Paratici to make the environment around him the best possible in order for him to succeed with funds brought about through sales.


All eyes will remain on Levy though even if this appointment has been driven by Paratici.

One hope to cling to for the fans could be that Tottenham's managerial appointments in the past 20 years have been most successful when Levy has not got his man or that man he wanted has not succeeded.

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In 2014 Pochettino himself was second choice behind Louis van Gaal only for the Dutchman to turn down the job. Years before him, assistant manager Martin Jol enjoyed success after taking over from the mess that came from the long wait for and then resignation of Jacques Santini.

Then Harry Redknapp hauled Tottenham up the table after the man Levy had controversially gone behind Jol's back to get - Juande Ramos - failed in the Premier League.

Pochettino, Jol and Redknapp all advanced Spurs' cause during their originally unlikely eras in north London and there will be hope that Fonseca can make the most of being down the initial pecking order.

Tottenham chased their dreams in Pochettino and Conte but the time was not right for either to return to London and the club and its fans must hope that Fonseca is the reality they require.
 
Dave

Dave

Player in Training.
I hope he works out, I really do...but to be honest, I think I would have preferred Scotty Parker get a shot. He knows the club, knows the PL, would have been as cheap, if not cheaper. He would had the players respect overnight and we'd have played good football and shown a bit of grit too....

Still........I guess we'll just have to see how this bloke is. I don't think I've been ever this "meh" over an appointment though. Uninspiring to say the least....
 
J.spurs

J.spurs

Well-Known Member
Founding Member
I hope he works out, I really do...but to be honest, I think I would have preferred Scotty Parker get a shot. He knows the club, knows the PL, would have been as cheap, if not cheaper. He would had the players respect overnight and we'd have played good football and shown a bit of grit too....

Still........I guess we'll just have to see how this bloke is. I don't think I've been ever this "meh" over an appointment though. Uninspiring to say the least....
Same. Nothing against him, it’s really more that he has a massive task ahead of him, and I just have no idea if he’s the sort to pull it off. At least he’s not Mourinho...
 
spurious

spurious

Player in Training.
Here we go again. Blaming myself, not Levy, however.

Thought a return for Poch would be too soon. Hated the idea. Then began hearing about it, got excited, and had my hopes dashed.

Didn't want Conte. Hated the idea. Then began hearing about it, got excited, and had my hopes dashed.

Didn't really remember who the fuck Fonseca was. Hated the idea. Then began hearing about it, got excited, and....

We shall see.
 
ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
The Athletic reporting that he’s agreed a two year deal and that the only formality left now is his announcement, which is expected next week.
 
USspur

USspur

Player in Training.

Tottenham Hotspur are closing in on the appointment of Paulo Fonseca as their next manager.

The Athletic understands that Tottenham have been in advanced talks with Fonseca since Wednesday and that an agreement could be announced at the start of next week.

Fonseca, the former Roma manager, is poised to sign a contract until 2023, with the option for one additional year.

Fonseca, 48, is the preferred choice of incoming general manager Fabio Paratici, who is joining Tottenham from Juventus and is likely to be confirmed over the weekend.

What has taken Tottenham so long?​

Tottenham sacked Jose Mourinho in April and placed former player Ryan Mason in interim charge.

Since then Spurs made contact with former manager Mauricio Pochettino about a return to the club.

As The Athletic previously reported, former Inter Milan and Chelsea manager Antonio Conte was also in talks with Spurs to become their next manager.

The club also spoke to Fonseca at the start of their process but he moved up the list with the imminent arrival of Paratici.

Spurs re entered into talks with Fonseca this week and it is hoped that an agreement could be imminent.

How did Fonseca perform at Roma?​

Fonseca walked into a tough situation at Roma. The club had just missed out on the Champions League and faced a difficult restructure in light of some expensive mistakes in the transfer market under Monchi.

Owner Jim Pallotta then began takeover talks with the Friedkin Group which stalled when the pandemic hit and re-started over the summer.

A vacuum also opened up at the club when Monchi's successor Gianluca Petrachi was dismissed from his post which left Fonseca vulnerable. All the uncertainty did not make for an easy job.

Roma played some slick football and reached a European semi-final under the Portuguese but his record in big Serie A games and missing out on the top four again persuaded Roma's new owners to break with what they inherited.

Who is Paratici?​

Paratici is an Italian former football player who spent eleven years in a series of executive roles for Juventus, including chief football officer.

Juventus announced last week that his contract would not be renewed with a farewell press conference held on Friday, June 4.

Paratici previously worked with Conte at Juventus between 2011 and 2014, when the club won three consecutive Serie A titles.

The appointment of Paratici means Levy is preparing to delegate oversight of football matters to an influential new figure.

Levy has previously employed Comolli, Franco Baldini, Frank Arnesen and David Pleat in the role of sporting director but abandoned such a strategy in recent years, with Steve Hitchen serving as the club’s effective head of recruitment.
 
ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
This says all you need to know about the risk Levy knows he's taking...League one managers would get a better contract than that.
But isn't this on Paratici though ?

We're led to believe that he's being brought in as a "General Manager" who is responsible for the footballing side while Levy (finally) takes a step back so surely whether or not Fonseca succeeds or fails is on him ?
 
Dave

Dave

Player in Training.
"led to believe"
Key words...

I'd be more on the if it goes wrong, then it was Paratici.....and if he's a success, well, I'd say Danny will somehow try and take the credit. Or maybe I'm becoming a cynical paranoid middle aged man ?...Maybe all of the above. Who knows ?!? Ah the mysterious of life. And the madness of a Spurs fan.....
 
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BrooklynYid

BrooklynYid

Player in Training.
This does not excite me in any way. I suspect this will be a disaster and we'll finish around 10th, but I will be happy if proven wrong.
 
ClemFandango

ClemFandango

Player in Training.
Key words...

I'd be more on the if it goes wrong, then it was Paratici.....and if he's a success, well, I'd say Danny will somehow try and take the credit. Or maybe I'm becoming a cynical paranoid middle aged man ?...Maybe all if the above. Who knows ?!? Ah the mysterious of life. And the madness of a Spurs fan.....
Oh I've absolutely no doubt at all that Dear Leader will organise a full military parade if things start to go well.
 
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